You’ll need to set aside plenty of time to plan, film, edit, market, and analyze your content on a consistent basis. You’ll also need to define your brand’s goals and plan for how video can specifically help you achieve these. If you can devote an appropriate amount of time and energy into the platform, you’ll be able to create engaging, shareable content for your growing audience.
YouTube is a massive site, so it’s easy to quickly blow your ad budget, especially if you choose high-volume targeting options. Unless you’re working with a big budget to start with, set your budget low enough to ensure you don’t spend too much on a single keyword target. You can always raise your budget after you’ve had a chance to optimize your campaign and know which keywords offer the best ROI.

A video’s average percentage viewed, or retention rate, indicates the average percentage of a video your audience watches per view. A higher percentage means there’s a higher chance that your audience will watch that video until the end. Try placing cards and end screens in videos with a higher average percentage viewed rate to improve the number of views your calls-to-action receive.


What does aperture mean for your video? When a lot of light comes into the camera (with a low f-stop number), you get a brighter image and a shallow depth of field. This is great for when you want your subject to stand out against a background. When less light comes into the camera (with a high f-stop number), you get what's called deep depth of field and are able to maintain focus across a larger portion of your frame.

We all know about Facebook contests, Instagram contests, and even Pinterest contestshttps://blog.hootsuite.com/secrets-youtube-contest/. But what about YouTube contests? They’re not as common, but they are a great strategy. Since they’re not as common, this gives you an edge if you decide to use them. Like all other social contests, a YouTube contest can do a lot to help increase subscribers, engagement, and social shares. And, when executed correctly, lead generation and/or user generated content.


As practice, try telling a story with your b-roll and planning out a shot sequence. For example, your subject might open a door from the hallway, walk into their office space, sit down at their desk, open their laptop, and begin typing. Seems simple, right? But a shot sequence showing this 10-second scenario might consist of six or more different b-roll clips.
Friends, coworkers, and even family can be great resources here for finding the locations you need. Keep in mind that for some locations, like businesses and other private property, you will need permission from the owner to film. To keep things simple, it’s best to find your locations through people you know — at least for your first few productions.

The exact settings on your camera will depend on your model, but there's likely an auto option, a bunch of presets (daylight, cloudy, tungsten, etc.), and custom. Avoid auto white balance at all costs and opt for a preset or custom instead. If you have a top-of-the-line DSLR, there may also be an option to manually set the color temperature of the room, measured in Kelvin.
Not only do subtitles and closed captions help viewers, but they also help optimize your video for search by giving you another opportunity to highlight important keywords. You can add subtitles or closed captions by uploading a supported text transcript or timed subtitles file. You can also provide a full transcript of the video and have YouTube time the subtitles automatically, type the subtitles or translation as you watch the video, or hire a professional to translate or transcribe your video.
A video’s average percentage viewed, or retention rate, indicates the average percentage of a video your audience watches per view. A higher percentage means there’s a higher chance that your audience will watch that video until the end. Try placing cards and end screens in videos with a higher average percentage viewed rate to improve the number of views your calls-to-action receive.
Lastly, here’s one more pro tip for YouTube ad: Don’t use a template or “slideshow” with your logo on it to start off your video. While you do want to show your logo somewhere within the first five seconds, it’s better to show a clip with your logo on one of your products or services—or employees—instead of plastering your logo up on the screen. Instead of letting them know who your company is, it deters many viewers from staying on your ad because it loses their attention and interest.

Most successful YouTubers have a very strict publishing schedule – and they stick to it.  These YouTubers also promote new videos to their audience on other social media platforms so that even those who haven’t subscribed to their channel can still know when a new video is coming out. While you’re setting up a YouTube marketing strategy for your business, consider how often you can realistically commit to posting new content and make sure you can stick to it.
The first is nearly self-explanatory. Video is huge right now. It is dominating the world of marketing, and if you aren’t using video, you’ll almost certainly lose out to your competitors. That’s not a hyperbole; with video ranking higher on all social platforms and performing well in ads, customers are more likely to notice and respond to businesses using video.
During the shoot, your job goes beyond pressing record. First and foremost, you need to be a coach. Balance critical feedback with support and be quick to give encouragement after each take. This is why conducting a table read during the scripting process is so important: It's easier to give feedback when there's not a camera in the room. Remember, be a little silly during the shoot or your talent will be on edge and uncomfortable — and it will show in the footage.

All channels should absolutely, 100% have a featured video. This video will be placed prominently in the top and near-center of your channel. When users click to it, it will auto-play, catching their attention immediately. This lets you choose how you want to introduce yourself to your viewers. This is particularly important, because the description of your business doesn’t appear on your first page.
A video’s average percentage viewed, or retention rate, indicates the average percentage of a video your audience watches per view. A higher percentage means there’s a higher chance that your audience will watch that video until the end. Try placing cards and end screens in videos with a higher average percentage viewed rate to improve the number of views your calls-to-action receive.
In the film industry, this step is called location scouting, and like every other step in this process, it’s an important part of creating a compelling video. To get started, take a look at your storyboard, and create a list of the different locations each scene requires. Depending on your video concept, you may only need one location ... or you may need a new location for each scene. 
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