Considered as one of the biggest social media platforms, YouTube really changed the image of internet along with its contemporaries like Google, Facebook and Twitter – the titans of the modern World Wide Web. For the past decade, the internet has been transformed from a source of information into haven for different ventures like entertainment, music, games and business.
Before launching any marketing campaign, it's important to determine your primary video goal. This could be to increase brand awareness, engagement, or even conversions for a free trial. It's crucial to pick out just one or two goals for each video. When you define more than that, your video will seem unfocused, making it difficult for viewers to determine what they should do next.
Bottom line, overall strategy and data should drive your video marketing strategy. First, plan a solid strategy to develop video(s) for each level of your sales funnel. Outline the content and goals of each individual video. Determine what metrics will best determine a video’s success. Then, test. Analyze. Tweak your videos (and their deployment), when necessary. Work to make them more effective. And whatever you do, do do video; in 2017 and beyond, it’s the cornerstone of your brand’s marketing efforts.
When you use online video in your digital marketing strategy, you have the perfect opportunity to enhance your brand’s message and drive your company persona home. Through simple features like design and branding, to more advanced features like voice and content, video marketing is the ideal tool to strengthen your brand identity and make sure that your customers know who you are.
When one of our clients wanted a video to explain the process of installing some HVAC equipment, we created this video to debunk a somewhat confusing process. Instead of continuously fielding the same questions about what to expect, how long the process would take, and any necessary preparations they needed to complete in advance, they decided an explainer video would be a more convenient and memorable way for clients to find and reference the answers to their questions.
Case studies: Another way you can promote your business and your products or services is to create video case studies of your clients. These case studies don’t need to deal exclusively with your product: they can focus on client origin stories, recent achievements, or plans for the future. Hootsuite publishes videos of their work with different brands:
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Hey Brian there is a very good chance it is the platform that your website is on do you know if its mobile responsive, or what platform your using for example WIX, Weebly, WordPress, etc? I have clients come to me all of the time with this issue, I would be happy to check it out for you if you want to email me your web site [email protected]
Here's where the final lesson of composition comes in: continuity. Continuity is the process of combining shots into a sequence so that they appear to have happened at the same time and place. A key part of continuity is making sure any ancillary objects in the scene — for example, a cup of water on a desk — stay in the same place (and have the same amount of water) throughout all of the shots.
When creating an ad, you have 5 seconds to hook the viewer in so they watch more of your video. You see what Tai Lopez does? The background is him standing in a mansion, and the first thing he says is that he’s going to give you a tour of his mansion. Then he introduces himself. And to keep you watching, he gives you a video tour of the mansion while he talks about himself and what he offers. This is great marketing that few people have done.
Tripods range tremendously in price, and the quality of your tripod should depend on the level of camera and lens you have. If you're shooting with your phone, you can get by with a table mount like the Arkon Tripod Mount or a full-size tripod like the Acuvar 50” Aluminum Tripod. For a DSLR, Manfrotto makes a variety of trustworthy tripods starting with the Manfrotto BeFree and increasing in quality and price from there.
When researching keywords, I recommend doing keyword research both for Google, and specifically for YouTube. This way, you’ll make sure that you’re ranking as best you can on both search engines, increasing views significantly. Any of the top keyword research tools will work for Google (I discuss them in-depth here), and I most recommend keywordtool.io’s YouTube-specific search. Prioritize the keywords you find in the YouTube search, as this will be your best bet for being found.
With the basic profile complete, it’s time to add a few finishing touches! Before we move on, it’s important to get one thing straight — you can customize the way your YouTube channel looks to subscribers and unsubscribed visitors. This means that unsubscribed viewers would see different featured content than dedicated, subscribed viewers. Pretty cool, right?
Try and reach out to a YouTuber that makes videos about your industry, or one who resonates with your desired customer. This is an extremely effective way to bring attention to your brand and content, and is a win-win for both parties involved. When you collaborate with someone who has a similar audience to yours, the cross-exposure is both organic and lucrative.
White balance tells your camera the color temperature of the environment you're shooting in. Different types of light have different colors. For example, incandescent bulbs (like what many people put in a lamp) have a very warm color. The fluorescent lights (if you're reading this in an office, look up) are a little bit cooler. Daylight is cooler yet. Before you begin shooting, you have to adjust your camera's white balance according to your setup.
According to Google, “93 percent of millennials go to YouTube to learn how to do something.” Since YouTube is the second largest search engine after Google, and studies show “how-to content” earns more attention than any other category, this is a great opportunity to showcase the employees that your clients will actually come face to face with at some point. By demonstrating your professional expertise and allowing visitors a chance to become more familiar with your team, you’re killing two birds with one stone. Plus, these videos can encourage interaction between you and your viewers if you ask them for future topics of discussion, feedback, questions, etc. in the form of comments or messages.
Professional cameras, like DSLRs, give you fine control over the manual settings of shooting video and allow you to achieve the shallow depth of field (background out of focus) that people rave about. While they're primarily used for photography, DSLRs are incredibly small, work great in low light situations, and pair with a wide range of lenses — making them perfect for video. However, DSLRs do require some training (and additional purchases) of lenses.

You should focus on targeting one goal per video (as we talk about here). Some of the most common video goals are to increase brand awareness, views, clicks, or inbound links or social shares. Depending on how you use the video in your marketing material, the goal could be to increase the open rate of an email series or improve the conversion rate on a landing page. YouTube is a great platform for growing brand awareness.


Visit each location before the shoot. On your scouting trips, make sure you’ll be able to capture the kinds of shots you want for your video. Typically, it’s better to have more space so you can adjust the camera position as needed. You should also check for any loud or ambient noise like busy roads or air conditioning units that could interfere with your audio when filming, and consider the light and time of day. While the room might have sufficient light in the morning, you may need to bring a lighting kit in to film during the afternoon or evening.
Once you determine how often you can post, you should also consider when you release your videos. According to Oberlo, most viewers watch YouTube videos in the evenings and on weekends. The best time to post your content is early afternoons during the week or early Saturday and Sunday mornings so that your videos will be indexed by the time your potential viewers are searching.
Friends, coworkers, and even family can be great resources here for finding the locations you need. Keep in mind that for some locations, like businesses and other private property, you will need permission from the owner to film. To keep things simple, it’s best to find your locations through people you know — at least for your first few productions.
For any "attract" video, avoid speaking too much about your product. Instead, let your brand values and personality be your north star(s). Finally, because these videos can live on a variety of channels, keep in mind the strategies of each platform. For example, a Facebook video might have a square aspect ratio and text animations for soundless viewers.
After you've determined the type of music you need, it's time to start analyzing potential songs. Consider the song's pacing. Songs with a steady rhythm are easy to change to suit your video style. Hoping to include your favorite, Top 40 hit? Popular, radio songs are usually structured in 4-5 parts and can be difficult to transition. Try to choose simple songs that are easy to loop. If you're looking for an instrumental song, be sure to find something that was recorded with real instruments. Songs made with digital samples can make your video feel unprofessional and out of date.
Did you know that the top listing in Google’s organic search results gets an average of 34% of the clicks? The second gets around 20%. The third gets 13%… That means all the rest of the results on page one (paid and organic) fight over the remaining 16%. The paid results only get about 5% of the traffic — it’s a horrible affliction referred to as “ad blindness.”
For channel art, choose something that represents your business while being visually dynamic. I highly recommend using graphic design tool Snappa to create your YouTube channel art. They have pre-made templates that are sized to fit your channel perfectly, all of which are fully customizable. Try to use similar colors, fonts, and stylistic choices that you make on your website and profile picture. You can also add text to help get your point or brand across more quickly. A great example is AdEspresso’s own channel art:
From this portal, you'll find all sorts of viewer insights. Discover what types of video content your audience likes and how they watch their videos. Then, channel those insights directly into your marketing automation software or CRM. For example, if that prospect you've been monitoring views your latest case study video, you'll be notified straight away.

How-to videos: How-to videos tend to perform very well because they provide a lot of value to the viewer. For example, if you were selling social media software, you could create how-to videos showing your viewers how to get started with Twitter marketing or how to grow your Facebook following. You can look to top performing blog posts for material for these videos, or you can develop a plan for a recurring series. JetBlue has a series of “Flight Etiquette” videos that emphasize how not to travel:

View Count: View count is the number of times your video has been viewed — also referred to as reach. This metric is great to track if your goal is to increase brand awareness and have your content seen by as many people as possible. However, it's important to remember that every video hosting platform measures a view differently. For example, a view on YouTube is 30 seconds while a view on Facebook is only 3 seconds. Be sure to read the fine print before reporting on your video view count.

What does aperture mean for your video? When a lot of light comes into the camera (with a low f-stop number), you get a brighter image and a shallow depth of field. This is great for when you want your subject to stand out against a background. When less light comes into the camera (with a high f-stop number), you get what's called deep depth of field and are able to maintain focus across a larger portion of your frame.
In a disconnected digital world, people are seeking out ways in which they can feel a sense of engagement and connection. That’s one explanation for how authentic storytelling through the use of video is proven to increase engagement. Whether it’s through actions like comments, likes, or shares, if people are responding to your video marketing content, that’s a great sign that you’re on the right track.
Channel trailer:Your trailer should be short and sweet (around 30 to 60 seconds). Focus on showing visitors what your channel is about and what they can expect to see in your videos. Don't forget to encourage them to subscribe. Your trailer won’t be interrupted by ads, which will keep the user focused on why they should watch more videos from your brand.
Finally, consider adding intro and outro music. Intro and outro music, or bookends, can serve as a theme for your content. These are a great choice if you don't need music throughout your entire video. Bookend music can help set the tone for your video, naturally split your content into chapters, and leave your viewers feeling they had a complete experience.
Just like a customer testimonial or product review can help to build trust in your company, your brand, and your product, they can also help to boost engagement. Watching someone demonstrate how your product or service improved their efficiency or solved their problem is so much more believable (and memorable) than just reading an article about it.
With the basic profile complete, it’s time to add a few finishing touches! Before we move on, it’s important to get one thing straight — you can customize the way your YouTube channel looks to subscribers and unsubscribed visitors. This means that unsubscribed viewers would see different featured content than dedicated, subscribed viewers. Pretty cool, right?
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